Search Geneocity.com:

Database Index

Jacob Dittoe; Misc. Bits and Pieces from non-Catholic sources.
Top Researched Families
Bundy
Daugherty
Derryberry
Dittoe
Downey
Elder
Finnen
Flautt
Gaines
Jackson
Joyce
Kellenbarger
Keller
McCourtney
Moore
Prout
Schorr
Sloan
Thomas
Tuthill

From Howe's 1888 Collection:

This county was first settled by Pennsylvania Germans, about the years 1802
and 1803. Of the early settlers the names of the following are recollected; John
382

Hammond, David Pugh, Robt. McClung, Isaac Brown, John and Anthony
Clayton, Isaac Reynolds, Daniel Shearer, Peter Overmyer, Adam Binckley, Wm.
and Jacob Dusenbury, John Poorman, John Finck, Daniel Parkinson, John
Lashley, Peter Dittoe, John Dittoe, and Michael Dittoe.

GENERAL PHILIP HENRY SHERIDAN CHRONOLOGY:

Born in Albany, New York, March 6, 1831, the son of Irish laboring people. Lived his
infancy and youth in Somerset, Ohio; was a clerk for a while in Somerset in the hardware
store of John Talbot and then in the dry-goods store of Finck & Dittoe, and from there
entered as a cadet the United States Military Academy...

From University of Notre Dame Archives:

1832 Sep. 27

Rese, Father Frederick
Cincinnati, Ohio

to Bishop Edward Fenwick of Cincinnati
Canton, Ohio

Received Fenwick's letter - Death of Father Richard at Detroit - Father (Vincent) Badin in charge there - The Redemptorists satisfied on visit to Green Bay and have called their members there - Novices have been rejected at St. Rose's - Expects return of Father (John T.) Van den Broek (O.P.) - Discusses money matters - Urges Fenwick to write Father Hickey of Emmittsburgh about sisters - Wants to erect a society of ladies like that of New Orleans to aid the sisters - As Mr. Cassilly agrees, should be trained at the Dominicans if not at Emmittsburgh - Advises ordination of Mr. Deloughery if the Archbishop has no objection - Hopes Father (Louis) De Seilles is well with Father (S.H.) Montgomery since he left for Kentucky - Hopes to start two schools, English and German - Asks about Wednesday and Friday dispensations - Father (Martin) Kundig should return to Cincinnati.
P.S. Money if needed can be found in package of letters - Mentions Fathers Adrian Van de Weyer, and Lostrie - Mr. Dittoe to get subscribers for the Catholic Telegraph and Father Kundig's boys for the college.

II-4-e A.L.S. (French) 4pp. 4to.

From 1883 History of Perry County:

New Reading, in Reading Township, is in reality the oldest town in the county. It was not laid out until
1805 and thereby lost its distinction of official priority for Hanover was platted by Jacob Ditto in 1804...

FINK, JOEL A., farmer, Jackson township; post office, Junction
City: son of Joseph and Magdalene (Dittoe) Fink; was born August
17, 1816, in this township; has since lived in the county, and always
led a farmer's life from boyhood. He was married in 1840, to Miss
Margaret, daughter of Thomas and Margaret (Doran) Ryan. They
are the parents of five children, viz.: Joseph, Sarah, Mary, William

and Charles. His parents were of German descent. Mr. Fink's
father came to Somerset in 1805, His grandfather, John Fink, assisted
in laying out the town of Somerset...

FINCK, WILLIAM E., lawyer, Somerset; was born in Somerset, in
the year 1822. His father was Anthony Finck, and his mother's maiden
name was Mary Spurk. His grandfather was John Finck, an early
settler, if not the first, in Somerset. His wife was Cecelia Garaghty
of Lancaster, Ohio. Their sons are, William E., Jr., and Michael G.
Finck; the latter a grocer and the former a lawyer. Their daughters
are Mary, now wife of F. A. Dittoe, merchant of Somerset, and Miss
Martha....

FINCK, AUSTIN A., was born in 1829 in Somerset; son of Anthony
and grandson of John Finck, the grand progenitor of this family in Perry
county. The sons of this ancient pioneer were Jacob, Joseph, George,
Anthony, John, Adam, and David Finck; the daughters were Mrs.
Sarah Johnson, Mrs. Elizabeth McDonald, Mrs. Frances Hewett, and
Mrs. Mary McGowen. Austin A. was educated in Perry county and
drilled in the duties of a dry goods clerk. In May, 1854, he was married
to Miss Caroline Lewis, of Rushville. Their children are William
B. Finck, Miss Carrie and Miss Ellie Finck. Austin A. Finck runs
far ahead of his ticket for clerk of his township, which office, as also
that of village clerk, he is now filling, as for a long time since, to the
satisfaction of the public. His great capacity as a dry goods clerk,
ripened also by experience as a merchant on his own account, has
secured for him a situation in the famous store-rooms of F. A. Dittoe,
Esq., of Somerset. Here his urbanity, honesty and attentiveness to
customers are winning a large trade for that celebrated establishment.
The store-room was built by Mr. Mike Dittoe, an architect of thirty
years experience in New York City, which was presented to his brother,
F. A. Dittoe, and is equal to the best in Ohio in finish and adaptation to its present use, and for many coming years will stand as a model of
architectural taste.

FINK, DAVID, farmer; post office, Somerset, Ohio. He was born
in 1830. and is a son of Joseph and grandson of John Finck, the great
ancestor of all the Fincks in Reading township, and who is the father
of Somerset, having settled where the Union school-house of that town
now stands in 1804 or 1805. His house, which served for a tavern, was
the first ever erected in the town, of which John Finck and one Miller
became the original proprietors. He owned the famous " Finck's
Spring," now the property of his grandson, Hon. William E. Finck.
No Catholic name antedates that of John Finck and his wife, whose
maiden name was Mary Sneeringer. This venerable pair, with their
family, were themselves numerous and devoted enough to form
the nucleus of the first Catholic church not only in Perry county but in
the State of Ohio. David Fink's mother was, prior to her marriage,
in 1815. Miss Magdalena Dittoe, daughter of Jacob, Sr..and sister of
Jacob, Jr., who deceased in Somerset in 1880. The brothers of David
are Joel A., post office Junction City, Ohio; James J., post office New
Lexington, Ohio; and his sisters are Sarah, wife of Thomas Largey.
post office Altoona, Iowa; Elizabeth, wife of Daniel Riffle, Lancaster,
Ohio. David Fink was first married in 1853 to Miss Bridget Dittoe,
who died April 29th, 1856. His second marriage was to Miss Lizzie
O'Brien, February, 1861, who is the mother of Emerantia, Imelda S.,
Margaret L., Oscar M., Mary Nora, Helen C., and Estella C. Fink.
David obtained his farm by deed from his father, who died in 1870, at
the age of seventy-nine years, his mother having died in 1863. This
delightful homestead is in sight of St. Joseph's; contains the nearest
coal vein to Somerset; is well adapted to fruit and small grain. Four
hundred gallons of Iona and Concord wine, the vintage of 1881, testify
its capacity for fruit growing. Like his ancestors, he is a devoted and
sincere Catholic; has also served in various official stations, by the favor
of his fellow citizens, and is by no means among the hindmost in the
march of progress.

From Somerset Courthouse History:

The area of what is now Perry County was settled about 1802-1803, primarily by Pennsylvania Germans. Some of the early settlers' names are still familiar today: Hammond, Pugh, McClung, Brown, Clayton, Reynolds, Shearer, Overmyer, Binckley, Dusenbury, Poorman, Finck, Parkinson, Lashley and Dittoe. Many others are not listed.

The following are from a Ditto search of Timothy E. Fisher's pages

1819 Tax list

Jacob (6)
Jacob
Jacob (4)
Joseph (3)

FINK, JOEL A., farmer, Jackson township; post office, Junction City: son of Joseph and Magdalene (DITTOe) Fink...
FINCK, WILLIAM E., lawyer, Somerset; was born in Somerset, in the year 1822. His father was Anthony Finck, and his mother's maiden name was Mary Spurk. His grandfather was John Finck, an early settler, if not the first, in Somerset. His wife was Cecelia Garaghty of Lancaster, Ohio. Their sons are, William E., Jr., and Michael G. Finck; the latter a grocer and the former a lawyer. Their daughters are Mary, now wife of F. A. DITTOe, merchant of Somerset, and Miss Martha.
FINCK, AUSTIN A., was born in 1829 in Somerset; son of Anthony and grandson of John Finck, the grand progenitor of this family in Perry county. The sons of this ancient pioneer were Jacob, Joseph, George, Anthony, John, Adam, and David Finck; the daughters were Mrs. Sarah Johnson, Mrs. Elizabeth McDonald, Mrs. Frances Hewett, and Mrs. Mary McGowen. Austin A. was educated in Perry county and drilled in the duties of a dry goods clerk. In May, 1854, he was married to Miss Caroline Lewis, of Rushville. Their children are William B. Finck, Miss Carrie and Miss Ellie Finck. Austin A. Finck runs far ahead of his ticket for clerk of his township, which office, as also that of village clerk, he is now filling, as for a long time since, to the satisfaction of the public. His great capacity as a dry goods clerk, ripened also by experience as a merchant on his own account, has secured for him a situation in the famous store-rooms of F. A. DITTOe, Esq., of Somerset. Here his urbanity, honesty and attentiveness to customers are winning a large trade for that celebrated establishment. The store-room was built by Mr. Mike DITTOe, an architect of thirty years experience in New York City, which was presented to his brother, F. A. DITTOe, and is equal to the best in Ohio...
FINK, DAVID, farmer; post office, Somerset, Ohio. He was born in 1830. and is a son of Joseph and grandson of John Finck, the great ancestor of all the Fincks in Reading township, and who is the father of Somerset, having settled where the Union school-house of that town now stands in 1804 or 1805. His house, which served for a tavern, was the first ever erected in the town, of which John Finck and one Miller became the original proprietors. He owned the famous " Finck's Spring," now the property of his grandson, Hon. William E. Finck. No Catholic name antedates that of John Finck and his wife, whose maiden name was Mary Sneeringer. This venerable pair, with their family, were themselves numerous and devoted enough to form the nucleus of the first Catholic church not only in Perry county but in the State of Ohio. David Fink's mother was, prior to her marriage, in 1815. Miss Magdalena DITTOe, daughter of Jacob, Sr..and sister of Jacob, Jr., who deceased in Somerset in 1880. The brothers of David are Joel A., post office Junction City, Ohio; James J., post office New
Lexington, Ohio; and his sisters are Sarah, wife of Thomas Largey. post office Altoona, Iowa; Elizabeth, wife of Daniel Riffle, Lancaster, Ohio. David Fink was first married in 1853 to Miss Bridget DITTOe, who died April 29th, 1856. His second marriage was to Miss Lizzie O'Brien, February, 1861, who is the mother of Emerantia, Imelda S., Margaret L., Oscar M., Mary Nora, Helen C., and Estella C. Fink.
David obtained his farm by deed from his father, who died in 1870, at the age of seventy-nine years, his mother having died in 1863. This delightful homestead is in sight of St. Joseph's; contains the nearest coal vein to Somerset; is well adapted to fruit and small grain. Four hundred gallons of Iona and Concord wine, the vintage of 1881, testify its capacity for fruit growing. Like his ancestors, he is a devoted and sincere Catholic; has also served in various official stations, by the favor of his fellow citizens, and is by no means among the hindmost in the march of progress.
SCALLON, THOMAS, born 1821, in Washington, D.C., where his
father, James, and his mother, Mary Scallon, arrived in 1819, from
Wexford county, Ireland. His mother was a daughter of Patrick
Redmond, and the sister of George Redmond, former Treasurer of Perry
county, and of John Redmond, for many years a Justice of the Peace
in Muskingum county. Her sisters are Bridget and Ann, now the wife
of George Brehm, and Catharine, the deceased wife of the late
venerable Miles Cluney; and Peggy, widow of the late John DITTOe. The
children of Mrs. Scallon are Thomas and Mrs. Mary Ann Echenrode,
late of this county, and the mother of Thomas and Mary Echenrode,
her only children. Thomas Scallon was married in 1843, to Miss Mary,
daughter of John DITTOe
. His children are: Mary; James, a plasterer
by trade, post office, Lancaster; Rev. Thomas, a Dominican priest at
St. Joseph's; Helen, a nun of St. Francis De Sales, Newark, Ohio,
and known there as sister Genevieve; Miss Anna, and George, post
office, Somerset, Ohio. Thomas Scallon came to Perry county in 1829,
when only eight years of age, and has resided on the same farm over
fifty years, occupying the ancestral acres of his father, James Scallon,
who deceased seven years after his settlement thereon, in sight of
Somerset. He has improved the old homestead with excellent buildings;
served for many years as township assessor, several times performing
all the work himself; so that faithfulness in office and to his duties as a
private citizen, are among the virtues unanimously accorded to him.
SCOTT, MARTIN F., merchant; born in Ohio county, West
Virginia, in 1812. Son of Mathew Scott, born in Kilkenney; and Elizabeth
Lacy Scott, born in Wicklow county, Ireland; came to this country in
1800. His father was an officer in the English Army, and was present
at the trial of Robert Emmett, an incident of his life to which he ever
after referred to with emotions of sorrow. He began mercantile life
in Baltimore, Maryland, and about the year 1808, removed to Wheeling,
West Virginia, bought a farm on the Ohio side of the river, but
resided on the Virginia side, where Martin was born. This careful,
cautious, honest and successful man was bred to the mercantile life,
which he yet pursues in his old age. He came to Somerset in 1838,
after the death of his mother in 1837, intending to go to New Orleans.
He changed his course to Iowa, intending to purchase land, and turn
his occupation to that of a farmer. In the Des Moines valley he called at a
house; a woman with a child in her arms responded. He inquired of her if there was any land to enter in this beautiful part of the State. "Are
you one of those land grabbers ?" was the greeting. " What does that
mean, madam ? " "One of those speculators who buy large tracts here
and prevent the settlement of the country." "No," said Mr. Scott,
"I intend settling here if I buy." And then, eyeing the woman more
closely, he said, "your name was Johnson and I sold you your wedding
dress." "Then your name is Martin Scott," exclaimed the lady, as
she rushed forward to welcome him. He selected a section of land.
Nothing but gold and silver and Missouri bank notes would be received
at the land office; scores of buyers were there waiting for the sales
to open. Plowing around one acre and laying down four logs made a
squatter's claim, and many made these claims, sold out and then moved
on. The land sales were postponed, and Mr. Scott says, "That act of
Van Buren's administration turned my feet back to Somerset, and he
shall have the blame or the honor of my being here." While yet a
lad he was sent from Belmont county to St. Joseph's in Perry county,
to learn his catechism, the distance being over one hundred miles, and
the road from Somerset to the church, a path cut through the woods.
He was united in marriage with Cecelia DITTOe, daughter of Peter DITTOe,
of Mt. Harrison, May 3, 1842.
Their children are, viz.: Albert,
bred to the law, and who died at his father's residence, June 5, 1880,
leaving a widow and a son, Albert, both now in Washington. D. C.;
Thomas, commercial traveler, single; Lewis, married, residence
Chi-wa-hua-hua, Mexico, (pronounced Che-wah-wah), merchant, banker
and miner; Philip, clerk, at home, single. The daughters are, Mary,
Lizzie and Dora, all single and at home. The family has had excellent
opportunities for education, and all his sons exhibit commendable
traits of business.
SHERIDAN, GEN. PHILIP H., was born in Somerset, March 6, 1831.
His parents were Irish, and had recently emigrated from county Cavan,
in the northern part of their native land. They were members of the
strong Roman Catholic community that had settled in this vicinity, and
young Phil was reared in this faith at St. Joseph's Church. He secured
a fair common school education, and having within him the promise of
better things than the life of an ordinary villager, he obtained a clerkship
in the hardware store of Mr. Talbot, the best position open to an
aspiring youth in a small town. He proved energetic, faithful and
intelligent, and his leisure moments were occupied with the study of
mathematic and history, under the kind tutilage of his employer. A
better position with another storekeeper, Henry DITTOe, was offered him
and accepted
, but the gifted youth aspired to something better than
selling goods behind the counter of a village store, and faithfully
continued his studies.
This county was first settled by Pennsylvania Germans, about the years 1802
and 1803. Of the early settlers the names of the following are recollected; John
382

Hammond, David Pugh, Robt. McClung, Isaac Brown, John and Anthony
Clayton, Isaac Reynolds, Daniel Shearer, Peter Overmyer, Adam Binckley, Wm.
and Jacob Dusenbury, John Poorman, John Finck, Daniel Parkinson, John
Lashley, Peter DITTOe, John DITTOe, and Michael DITTOe.
GENERAL PHILIP HENRY SHERIDAN
CHRONOLOGY.

Born in Albany, New York, March 6, 1831, the son of Irish laboring people. Lived his
infancy and youth in Somerset, Ohio; was a clerk for a while in Somerset in the hardware
store of John Talbot and then in the dry-goods store of Finck & DITTOe
, and from there...

The people of Somerset and vicinity were much elated at securing
the location of the Scioto and Hocking Valley. There was an impromptu
but great celebration in honor of the event, which lasted nearly
all night. Immense bonfires were made, tar barrels burned, speeches
delivered, songs sung, and every demonstration of joy was made.
The result was scarcely expected, and when assured was almost overwhelming.
The people of the northern and western parts of the county went to
work, without delay, to obtain stock subscriptions: and there was subscribed
along the line in Perry county, the sum of about one hundred
and eighty-five thousand dollars; of this sum about one hundred and
seventy-two thousand was expended upon the road before the work
ceased. That part of the line between Portsmouth and Jackson C. H.,
was completed in 1852, or early in 1853, and the part of the line between
Jackson C. H. and Newark, the northern terminus of the road,
a distance of ninety miles, and which had been surveyed and located
by J. W. Webb, chief engineer, was now let to Seymour, Moore &
Company. This firm consisted of Thomas Seymour, late Chief Engineer
of the State of New York, a practical railroader, engineer and
builder; James Moore of Pennsylvania, who was also an experienced
railroad man, and George A. French of Dunkirk, New York. This
firm sublet the entire line. Ward and Taylor of New York State, took
the tunnel contract near Middletown, and began work upon the same
about the first of April. 1853; Fink and DITTOe of Somerset, took three
miles of the line to build, including the deep cut at Somerset. This
firm consisted of Adam Fink and Henry DITTOe. They broke ground on
their contract in February, 1853, and worked a large force of men and
horses for six or eight months, when they were compelled to cease by
reason of financial embarrassments. Fink and DITTOe sublet their northern
section to John Sheridan, father of Gen. P. H. Sheridan. This
section was finished by Mr. Sheridan. The next eight miles north were
taken by W. S. French & Co. This firm consisted of Walter S.
French of Dunkirk, New York, and T. Spencer Stillman of Wethersfield,
Conn. They commenced work in April. 1853, and employed on
an average about one hundred and sixty men and horses, and completed
and turned over their part of the line in May. 1854. A. H. Mills of the
State of New York, and Samuel Aiken of Pennsylvania, had about
three sections of this light work in the county, which they completed.
James McArdle, late of New Lexington, had a section or two in the
neighborhood of Thornville. The names of a few other sub-contractors
are not remembered.
The following named persons were citizens and voters in Reading
township, as early as 1816 or 1817:

Leonard Ream, Jacob Miller, Jacob Mains, Adam Anspach, John
Cassell, Jacob DITTOe, George Morris, John Beckwith, Thomas Neal,
John Beigler, Jacob Finck, John Hammond, John Finck, Sr., David
Beckwith, Thomas Cull, Joseph McNeil, Jesse McGowen, John Collins,
Peter DITTOe...

March 26th, 1808---Jeremiah Conoway and David Pugh, Trustees of
Reading township; Jacob DITTOe and Peter Overmyer, Grand Jurors;
and Robert Barnes, John Wagner, William Spencer and Henry Sellers,
Petit Jurors.

For April 2, 1809---Officers of Reading township: Joseph Petty,
Treasurer; Daniel Lidey, Robert Colborn, Supervisors; John Poorman,
George Souslin, Overseers of the Poor; Jacob Miller, Jacob DITTOe,
Fence Viewers; Joseph Shefler, Assessor; Christian Ream, House
Appraiser.

April 2, 1810---Officers of Reading township elected: Trustees, Jacob
DITTOe, Peter Overmyer, Smith Goodin; Township Clerk, John
DITTOe...

October 20, 1810---William Spencer and Smith Goodin came before
me, with their certificate from the hands of the Clerk of the county
of Fairfield, Ohio, and give bonds for the true performance of Justice
of the Peace of Reading township. JOHN DITTOE, Clerk.
Met and made settlement between the township and the officers and
issued orders on the township Treasurer, John Fink, one order of $6;
Jacob Miller, Supervisor of said township, $8; Jacob DITTOe, Peter
Overmyer, and Smith Goodin, Trustees of the aforesaid township, one
order each, and each one contained $3; and John DITTOe, Clerk of said
township, one order of $4.

April 6, 1812---State of Ohio, county of Fairfield: At an election
held for the township of Reading, there were elected for township officers:
Clerk, George Ziegler; Trustees, John Vanatta, Wm. Spencer,
and John Yost; Treasurer, Joseph Petty; Constables, John Forsythe
and Jacob Overmyer; Lister of Tax, John Parkinson; Supervisors, Jno.
McLain, Jacob DITTOe; Overseers of the Poor, Peter Overmyer, Jonathan
Loveberry; Fence Viewers, Jacob Miller, George Souslin.
The Trustees met the 18th of April, 1812, and laid off the township
in districts to supervisors..
At an election held in the county of Fairfield and the State of Ohio,
for the purpose of electing township officers for the township of Reading,
the following men were elected: Clerk, John Murray; Trustees,
David Beckwith, Christian Deal, Peter Overmyer; Treasurer, Joseph
Petty; Supervisors, Jacob DITTOe, Jonathan Babbs; Lister, Daniel
Parkinson; Overseers of the Poor, Peter Overmyer and John Wagner;
Fence Viewers, Jacob Miller and George Souslin; Appraiser of
Property, David Beckwith.

et al, at web page

The Court of Common Pleas convened again in July, 1818, the bench
the same as before, excepting that George Trout appears in the place of
David Beckwith as one of the associate judges. Beckwith had died,
and the County Commissioners had probably filled the vacancy by the
appointment of Trout. The first business at this term, with the
exception of receiving the report of the locating commissioners, was an
application by Jacob DITTOe for an order vacating the town of Hanover,
the first platted town within what is now the county limits. Hanover
was laid out in 1804, fourteen years before the creation of Perry county.
It was in Fairfield county and situated about four miles west of where
Somerset was afterward located. The petition of Mr. DITTOe was
granted, and an order made, vacating and making null and void the
plat of the town of Hanover.
The most important trial ever held in the county, was that of the
State of Ohio vs. David Work, indicted for the murder of Christopher
Hocker. The alleged crime was committed in Fairfield county, of
which Work was a citizen, and he was indicted by a Grand Jury, in the
Fairfield Court of Common Pleas. On motion of the defendant's
counsel, Stanbery, Reber and Orton, the court ordered a change of
venue to Perry county, for the alleged reason that the prisoner, under
the condition of public excitement, could not receive an impartial trial in
Fairfield. So the trial came on in Perry county, Judge Keith on the
bench. The crime alleged was committed in April 1836, and the
trial came on at the September term following. The jury impanelled to
try the case consisted of the following named persons: Michael DITTOe,
Peter Bugh, James Gorden, Samuel Parkinson, John Reed, Andrew
Walker, David Cap, Thomas Wright, James A. Clark, Joseph Good,
Moses Goodin, Peter Bowman. The trial occupied about two days,
and the jury, after deliberation, brought in a verdict of Murder in the
First Degree. On the 16th of September, Judge Keith sentenced him to be hanged on the 14th of October following, which sentence was
duly carried into execution by Daniel Kishler, who was then Sheriff of
the county. The evidence against Work was wholly circumstantial,
but no one appeared to doubt his guilt, though he asserted his innocence
to the last, and carefully wrote a manifesto to that effect, only forty-eight
hours previous to his execution:
Directors of the Poor, appointed by the County Commissioners,
preceded the Infirmary Directors. The first election for Infirmary Directors
was in 1842, when James J. Wilson, John Colborn and John Wright
were elected; In 1843, Bernard Grimes; in 1844, John Colborn; 1845,
John Wright; 1846, Patrick McCristal; 1847, John Grimes; 1848,
John Wright; 1849, Patrick McCristal; 1850, John Grimes; 1851,
John Wright; 1852, Moses Riley; 1853, Patrick McCristal; 1854,
Samual Forsythe; 1855, Joseph D. James; 1856, Jonah Skinner; 1857,
J. D. James; 1858, John Barker; 1859, George Kishler and Philip
Wolf; 1860, John Garey; 1861, John Barker; 1862, P.J. Kelley;
1863, John Garey; 1864, John Randolph; 1865, Philip Wolf; 1866,
John Flannagan; 1867, John Dillon; 1868, Philip Wolf; 1869, John
Flannagan; 1870, John Dillon; 1871, Samuel Brown; 1872, William
Adams; 1873, Robert Bennett; 1874, Samuel Brown; 1875, William
Adams; 1876, Robert Bennett; 1877, Samuel Brown; 1878, L. A.
Dean; 1879, Joseph Frymute; 1880, John Amrine; 1881, Kelita Rodgers.
Poter DITTOe was the first County Recorder, serving by appointment
from 1818 to 1832.
..
In 1855, the materials of the old True Democrat office came into the
possession of James Sheward, and he commenced publishing a paper
under the title of Democratic Union. A few months afterwards, he
became associated with Dr. Martin Kagay, in the publication of the
same paper, which partnership continued until the close of the Presidential
campaign of 1856. The Democratic Union was continued with
slight intermissions, during the years 1857 and 1858. Soon after the
October elections of 1858, George M. DITTOe purchased the office
. Mr.
DITTOe published the Democratic Union regularly, until the spring of
1864, when he sold it to Charles E. Magruder. Mr. Magruder run
the paper about a year, and then sold it to Charles D. Elder, who continued
its publication in Somerset, until May, 1866, when he removed
the office and paper to New Lexington.
The next year,
in l856,. Mr. George M DITTOe re-
vived the old Democratic Union and
continued its publication until 1863,

when the soldiers mobbed and wrecked
the office, and the Union, the paper,
had a period of masterly inactivity.
1846 Plat Maps
Jackson Twp., Sec. 1 Reading Twp., Range 16 Secs. 9W, 19, 20, 21, 22 & 28 Somerset
THE WAR OF 1812 AND MEXICAN WAR.

The war checked emigration to the county for several years, and in
fact seriously affected the whole country. After peace was declared,
what is now Perry county began to fill very rapidly, and the question
of a new county was pressed upon the people and legislature, and the
act finally passed in December, 1817.
103

THE WAR WITH MEXICO.---When Congress formally declared that
“War existed by the act of Mexico,” and Ohio was called on for its
quota of troops, early steps were taken in Perry county for the raising
of volunteers. Fletcher Noles of Somerset, who had been captain of
an independent military company, known as the Keokuks, in time of
peace, was very active and zealous in recruiting; and being considered
a good and efficient military man, was, when the company was raised,
duly elected and commissioned Captain. Isaac De Long, a lawyer,
also of Somerset, assisted in recruiting the company, and became Lieutenant.
Men were enlisted from all parts of the county, but principally
from the neighborhood of Somerset, then the county seat. The two
militia regiments of Perry county were to assemble and parade at Somerset,
and also all the volunteer companies of the county, for the purpose
of being harangued on the war question, with a view of getting
volunteers for active service in the army. The militia were massed in
a solid square in DITTOe's woods, west of town

THE HIPPODROME WAR.---The Hippodrome War, as the disturbance
is usually termed, which occurred in Somerset, in September,
1853, was a very serious affair, and for a time threatened far greater
dangers.
Welch's Hippodrome, a large traveling show, was announced to
exhibit in Somerset, Wednesday, September 7th, of the year before
mentioned, and came on according to announcement.
At this date, and for months previous, work was in progress on the
old Scioto and Hocking Valley Railroad. There were at least two
hundred laborers engaged upon the “deep cut” at Somerset, and there
were many other hands employed upon another section, not far away.
Nearly all of these railroad hands were of Irish nationality and quite a
number of them had been discharged from other places, and were generally
looked upon as dangerous men. The great majority, however,
were peaceable and industrious.
The Hippodrome had been extensively advertised and puffed, and
brought out large crowds of people, day and evening, the weather
being very fine. It had been arranged by Fink and DITTOe, the contractors
on the cut, that the wives and children of the laborers should
attend the show in the day-time, and the men at night.
GRIGGS, SAMUEL, born in New Jersey, November 19th, 1794; was
a son of Daniel Griggs, and brother of John, Christopher and Joacum,
the first and last named having died in Pennsylvania, while Christopher,
when last heard from, was in Iowa. Samuel sent a substitute into the
war of 1812, and in 1833, came in a two-horse wagon with his wife,
who was Debby Fields, and their two children, John and Elizabeth, to
Somerset, where they rested until they purchased the Henry Bowan
farm, a few miles west of Somerset, now known as the Miles DITTOe
farm...
COX, THOMAS B., JR., retired, Lancaster. His parents, Thomas
B., Senior, and Elizabeth (Vanpelt) Cox, were pioneers of Fairfield
county. Thomas B., Junior, was born in Bloom township, March 4,
1826. His father was a native of Pennsylvania, and was born in 1797.
He came with his father's family to Ohio in 1811. The family settled
due west of Mount Pleasant, where they built a brick house, about
1815, still in a state of good preservation. He was a prominent and
active business man in his day, and a successful merchant many years,
and a large property holder. He reared a family of three sons and
one daughter, all of whom are living. He was a member of the
Presbyterian Church at the time of his death, January 9, 1871. His widow
survived him some four years. Thomas B., Junior, remained with his
parents, engaged in farming, until 1852, when he engaged in the
wholesale and retail grocery trade, at Somerset, Perry county, which he
continued with success some ten years. Returning to Lancaster he
took charge of his father's estate, and upon the death of the latter, was
appointed administrator. Mr. Cox served as chairman of the Democratic
Executive Committee, of Perry county, six or seven years. He
was also elected member of the Legislature from the same county in
1857. He is an active Democrat in politics; takes a warm interest in
educational matters and is at present a member of the school board of
Lancaster. He was married November 28, 1865, to Miss Cecelia R.
DITTOe, of Somerset, Ohio
. They are the parents of six daughters and
one son.

Back

 

© 2001-2006, Geneocity.com |
Website by ThriftySites.com, Hosted by Lunarpages